Dedicated microscope cameras

Dedicated microscope cameras

Postby Leif Goodwin » Mon Aug 17, 2009 8:15 pm

Can anyone give me advice on dedicated microscope cameras? I use a Nikon D200 on a trinocular microscope, without a projection eyepiece (no need), but it is not convenient, and vibrations from the mirror and shutter are a problem, even with a cable release, and the lamp power level turned up to 11. Do dedicated cameras work well even with a x100 objective? I know the resolution is low e.g. 1MP, but to be honest I don't think you need much for microscopy, especially with a projection eyepiece. I like the idea of having a camera permanently attached to the 'scope, and being able to instantly view images on the PC, and optimise the focus in real time.
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Re: Dedicated microscope cameras

Postby Leif Goodwin » Wed Aug 19, 2009 6:07 pm

For what it's worth I ordered a dedicated camera from Brunel Microscopes.
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Re: Dedicated microscope cameras

Postby Mal Greaves » Wed Sep 02, 2009 2:26 pm

Lief
How have you found the Brunel camera?
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Re: Dedicated microscope cameras

Postby Leif Goodwin » Wed Sep 02, 2009 9:08 pm

malg wrote:Lief
How have you found the Brunel camera?
Mal Greaves


Hello Mal

I am considering writing a short review which I will post online. In short, for the price it is pretty good. Crummy software, but MICAM shareware is cheap and better and can be downloaded from the author's site. It is not as good as a 'proper' camera such as my D200. That was a disappointment. It seems to have more depth of field than the D200 which is consistent with a lower power optic (contrary to the manufacturers claims). I say this as it seems to show artifacts not seen with the D200. Or maybe they play around with the contrast. The explanation is not clear to me at the moment, and I might never know for sure. It is only 8 bit, which is another disappointment. It is convenient, which is why I wanted one. The 1.3MB version is a bargain IMO. One point to note is that it effectively replaces an eyepiece or plops onto the photo port. Hence if you use a microscope that requires compensating (projection) eyepieces then you might see some image degradation e.g. fringing. I use a micrscope with non compensating eyepieces and I see no fringing, and no obvious vignetting. Just in case you do not know what I mean, some microscopes have eyepieces that correct for aberrations in the objective and/or tube lens. It is hard to know what the image controls do. There is no ISO, only something called gain. The manual is poor.
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