To record or not to record?

The national UK fungal records database of the ABFG

To record or not to record?

Postby Roy Miller » Mon Apr 05, 2010 11:29 pm

I ask as I do not recollect seeing this being mooted before now. Could one verify if one finds only the mycellium of an organism, would that be counted as a find, for instance, the bootlaces of the honey fungus, or the mycelium of Chlorociboria aeruginascens.

Chlorociboria aeruginascens mycelium.JPG
Chlorociboria aeruginascens mycelium.JPG (95.5 KiB) Viewed 13286 times


FYI - I have previously only recorded fruiting body finds. I thought it needed asking.

All the best
[color=#008000][b]Roy[/b][/color]
Roy Miller
 
Posts: 180
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2009 1:09 am

Re: To record or not to record?

Postby Mal Greaves » Mon Apr 05, 2010 11:48 pm

Roy
I only tend to record the fruitbodies of this years specimen. If it is something special and I am unlikely to go for a subsequent visit I would probably record an old specimen but it would have to be an easily recognisable species such as a Geastrum.

Mal Greaves
Malcolm Greaves
Mal Greaves
 
Posts: 485
Joined: Thu Jul 16, 2009 11:45 pm

Re: To record or not to record?

Postby david dell » Tue Apr 06, 2010 7:34 am

The fruitbody of Tunbridge Green is a relatively rare sight,whereas the unmistakeable green gives away its presence.We record the green as the species and occasionally photo the fruitbody!
david dell
 
Posts: 305
Joined: Tue Mar 02, 2010 1:36 pm

Re: To record or not to record?

Postby admin » Tue Apr 06, 2010 9:37 am

There are no hard and fast rules as far as CATE is concerned, and it is probably a moot point whether a record should relate to fruiting or the presence of the mycelium. Field records tend to be based more safely on the former than the latter because unless one has recourse to DNA analysis, the macroscopic and microscopic appearance of the mycelium will only very rarely, if ever, provide a precise determination of species identity.

MJ
Michael Jordan
Forum moderator
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 532
Joined: Wed Jan 07, 2009 11:43 pm

Re: To record or not to record?

Postby Neil » Tue Apr 06, 2010 10:17 am

Would an ornithologist count a dead parrot as flying over London ? Probably not, but if a dead bluethroat (rare visitor like a robin, but blue) was found dead beneath power lines near RSPB Minsmere, I guess that would count.
Does the presence of green stained oak wood confirm the Green Wood Cup is still viable or can it also show that it was present last year, but never going to fruit again ? Likewise with the bootlaces of Honey Fungus.
Do you use your judgement to assess the state of decay to see if there is enough solid organic matter left to support another fruiting for the next season ? (I'll just read that again to see if it makes sense)

The answer is 7. ;)

Neil Mahler.
Neil
 

Re: To record or not to record?

Postby admin » Tue Apr 06, 2010 12:35 pm

Sound judgement from Neil there.

MJ
Michael Jordan
Forum moderator
admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 532
Joined: Wed Jan 07, 2009 11:43 pm

Re: To record or not to record?

Postby david dell » Tue Apr 06, 2010 1:33 pm

What do you do with ganodermas? Do you have to wait for them to "sporalate" to decide that they are still active.
Have taken part in a few debates on "tide line corpes" ( we started in "birding") but gave up when they changed the names and split species to increase the numbers available. I agree it depends how rare it was!
david dell
 
Posts: 305
Joined: Tue Mar 02, 2010 1:36 pm


Return to CATE

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron