Mycetinis alliaceus

A showcase for identified rare, exciting fungi, perhaps 'firsts' for your county

Mycetinis alliaceus

Postby Roy Miller » Mon Sep 12, 2016 3:25 am

On a moss covered fallen trunk in West Sussex today, Mycetinis alliaceus (syn: Marasmius alliaceus) a.k.a. Garlic Parachute.

DSC_1937a(fct) (2).jpg
Very distinctive smell of garlic at the base of the stipe


Edited photo
Attachments
DSC_1937 (fct).JPG
Very distinctive smell of garlic at the base of the stipe
Last edited by Roy Miller on Mon Sep 12, 2016 10:08 am, edited 1 time in total.
Roy Miller
 
Posts: 180
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2009 1:09 am

Re: Mycetinis alliaceus

Postby Leif Goodwin » Mon Sep 12, 2016 7:43 am

That species is very common in Ebernoe Common, in West Sussex, so much so that sometimes you can smell it from afar.

'Garlic Parachute', the so-called English names get sillier.
Fungi and Nature Photography: http://www.leifgoodwin.co.uk/Fungi/Fungi.html
Leif Goodwin
 
Posts: 1080
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2009 5:41 pm

Re: Mycetinis alliaceus

Postby Roy Miller » Mon Sep 12, 2016 10:12 am

Leif Goodwin wrote:That species is very common in Ebernoe Common, in West Sussex, so much so that sometimes you can smell it from afar ...


... and this was where it was found
Roy Miller
 
Posts: 180
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2009 1:09 am

Re: Mycetinis alliaceus

Postby Mal Greaves » Mon Sep 12, 2016 3:08 pm

Leif Goodwin wrote:'Garlic Parachute', the so-called English names get sillier.


Not a lot sillier than Mycetinis.
Mal
Malcolm Greaves
Mal Greaves
 
Posts: 485
Joined: Thu Jul 16, 2009 11:45 pm

Re: Mycetinis alliaceus

Postby Leif Goodwin » Mon Sep 19, 2016 7:41 am

Mal Greaves wrote:
Leif Goodwin wrote:'Garlic Parachute', the so-called English names get sillier.


Not a lot sillier than Mycetinis.
Mal


I disagree, but putting that aside, the Latin names have the advantage that they are used throughout the world, so if someone says they found Mycena galericulata, we all know what they mean. I can ask a question on a French forum, for example, and we all know we are using agreed names (subject to name changes of course). So now not only do we have to learn the Latin names, but we also have to learn these manufactured common names. And to make matters worse, many are plain stupid. So scurfy twiglet might be thought to look like a twig. It doesn't, it's a mushroom. Take Mycena crocata, whose defining feature is orange sap. The so called common name is Saffron bonnet. Well, more often than not it is not saffron, but grey, or whitish, sometimes with orange stains. At least the old common name of orange bleeding mycena made sense. But for me the worst aspect of these so called common names is that we find many people learning them, rather than the Latin names, leading to huge confusion. Why make the subject even harder for those of us with imperfect memories?
Fungi and Nature Photography: http://www.leifgoodwin.co.uk/Fungi/Fungi.html
Leif Goodwin
 
Posts: 1080
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2009 5:41 pm

Re: Mycetinis alliaceus

Postby Mal Greaves » Mon Sep 19, 2016 12:02 pm

I do actually agree Leif. Someone presented me with a Deceiving Bolete the other day and it took a bit before I worked out it was Suillelus (Boletus) queletii, which I am pretty sure it wasn't.
Where I now have problems is with the new Latin names appearing which are not being taken up by some.
Mal
Malcolm Greaves
Mal Greaves
 
Posts: 485
Joined: Thu Jul 16, 2009 11:45 pm

Re: Mycetinis alliaceus

Postby Leif Goodwin » Mon Sep 19, 2016 12:20 pm

Mal Greaves wrote:I do actually agree Leif. Someone presented me with a Deceiving Bolete the other day and it took a bit before I worked out it was Suillelus (Boletus) queletii, which I am pretty sure it wasn't.
Where I now have problems is with the new Latin names appearing which are not being taken up by some.
Mal


I am guilty of that latter sin, but the reason is that all my literature uses the old names. How on earth are we to keep up? :oops:
Fungi and Nature Photography: http://www.leifgoodwin.co.uk/Fungi/Fungi.html
Leif Goodwin
 
Posts: 1080
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2009 5:41 pm


Return to Look what I've found!

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

cron