Toadstools and Mushrooms of the Countryside by Edward Step.

Toadstools and Mushrooms of the Countryside by Edward Step.

Postby Mike Karpaty » Mon Jan 17, 2011 8:22 pm

Has anyone read " Toadstools and Mushrooms of the Countryside " by Edward Step ? The book dates back to 1914 and has some interesting facts. What is interesting are the name changes over the last 97 years and the historical information contained within the book. :P
Mike Karpaty
 
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Joined: Sun Dec 12, 2010 8:42 pm

Re: Toadstools and Mushrooms of the Countryside by Edward Step.

Postby Neil » Mon Jan 17, 2011 8:52 pm

Hi Mike,

This is a book I am not aware of, so now's yer chance to bombard us with the most interesting of the interesting facts. :P

Neil Mahler.
Neil
 

Re: Toadstools and Mushrooms of the Countryside by Edward Step.

Postby Mike Karpaty » Mon Jan 17, 2011 11:18 pm

Right here's a few for you to be getting on with. Hold on to your pedicels:

Venomous Toadstool, Amanita virosa : Considered to be the most deadly of then poisonous species back in 1914.

The Death Cap Amanita phalloides was known as the Vernal Toadstool.

St.Georges Mushroom, Tricholoma gambosum: Dr. Baham, who has gained much experience of fungus eating in Italy, where it is reduced to a fine art, declares this to be "the most savoury fungus with which i am aquainted". In a foot note he adds that this species "is much prized in the Roman market, where it easily fetches 30 baiocchi, i.e. 15d per lb,: a large sum for any luxury at Rome.

Veal Toadstool, Pleurotus subpalmatus : Named because of it's resemblance to that of meat.

Milky Toadstool, Lactarius : The French and Italians know these fungi as "cows" and "goats"

Mild Toadstool, Lactarius quietus : The white milk does not change colour, and is mild or sweet in taste, not unlike walnuts: but the odour of the toadstool is not at all pleasant, suggesting either castor oil or squashed bugs.

The Leek, Marasmius porreus : It may be known by it's strong, disagreeable odour of garlic, which clings to it even when the toadstool has been dried for years. It is said that specimens of it in Sowerby Herbarium, gathered in 1796, still retain their odour

Pimply Cobweb-cap, Cortinarius papulosus ; I just love the common name, brilliant.

I have run out of space so will add the last 5 tomorrow.
Michael.
Mike Karpaty
 
Posts: 32
Joined: Sun Dec 12, 2010 8:42 pm

Re: Toadstools and Mushrooms of the Countryside by Edward Step.

Postby Neil » Tue Jan 18, 2011 1:07 pm

I think with Amanita virosa, that still holds true.
The reason A.phalloides is responsible for most fatality's in the world is because it looks more palatable and is more widespread. The ghostly appearance of A.verosa alone is enough to put most people off attempting to eat this.

Neil.
Neil
 

Re: Toadstools and Mushrooms of the Countryside by Edward Step.

Postby Mike Karpaty » Tue Jan 18, 2011 8:28 pm

Toadstools and Mushrooms of the Countryside . Part 2.

Sulpher Tuft, Hypholoma fasciculare : Some years ago specimens were exhibited at a meeting of the Woolhope Club with stems four feet in length; they had been found growing on timbering at the Glynorrwg colleries.

The Magpie, Coprinus picaceus : It has an unpleasant fetid odour, and is believed to be poisonous, though there appears to be no positive evidence on the point. Should it be really so, it could not be considered as one of the dangerous species, for its strongly contrasted black and white must act as a deterrent to would be Toadstool eaters among our race as such "warning" contrasts are believed to act upon the lower animals. The fetid odour is an attraction to flies, which assemble upon it and suck up the spore laden fluid that results from the melting of the gills and so help to disseminate it. In spite of this assistance the magpie remains a rare fungus.

Dryad's Saddle, Polyporus squamosus : Sir William Hooker in his Flora Scotica mentions an example found by Mr. Hopkirk which had a circumference of seven feet five inches, and weighed (after having been cut four days) thirty four pounds. It gained this size in four weeks.The fungus was formerly much used for making razor strops scarcely seems suitable material upon which to exercise the degenerate masticatory apparatus of the present generation. Respecting the razor strop, Badham who declared it makes a strop far superior to any of those which in his day were "patented, and sold, with high sounding epithets, far beyond their deserts, " gives instructions for the preperation of one from this fungus, which may be useful in these days of bald chins.

Sulpher Polypore, Polyporus sulphureus : The Sulpher Polypore is one of those that are said to be edible, but it must be exceedingly difficult to masticate, and its strong unpleasant smell would in most cases act as a deterrent. It is sometimes phosphorescent. Among other Polypores from which amadou was prepared for the tinder box in pre-lucifer-match days was this species.

Birch Bracket, Polyporus betulinusThe thick flesh is also white and of fine and even texturewhich enables it to be cut into very thin slices - as is done by the entomologist for the mounting of delicate insects.

Thats all folks.
Michael.
Mike Karpaty
 
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Joined: Sun Dec 12, 2010 8:42 pm


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