The science behind this debate

Is focused foraging for edible fungi justifiable?

Re: The science behind this debate

Postby David Edington » Fri Oct 15, 2010 10:58 am

GeoffDann wrote:You can actually taste the vitamin C in beefsteak fungus, so there must be a significant amount.


Well in that case I might give it another chance as I need as much vitamin C as I can get to help me through my predicament whilst avoiding too many cold germs.

Cheers

David
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Re: The science behind this debate

Postby Neil » Sat Oct 16, 2010 9:27 pm

GeoffDann wrote:You can actually taste the vitamin C in beefsteak fungus, so there must be a significant amount.


So which of the following does vitamin C taste like Geoff ?
Rutin
Bioflavonoids (vitamin P)
Factor K
Factor J
Factor P
Tyrosinase
Ascorbinogen
Ascorbic Acid

Neil. (tastes like heaven on earth)
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Re: The science behind this debate

Postby GeoffDann » Sat Oct 16, 2010 11:10 pm

It tastes pretty horrible, actually...
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Re: The science behind this debate

Postby Neil » Sun Oct 17, 2010 9:19 am

GeoffDann wrote:It tastes pretty horrible, actually...


Nah, what I meant was I taste like heaven on earth, as the way I typed it made it look like my name was included in that list. :D
As for the fungus - now't special.

Neil.
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Re: The science behind this debate

Postby David Edington » Sun Oct 17, 2010 9:35 am

David Edington wrote:
GeoffDann wrote:You can actually taste the vitamin C in beefsteak fungus, so there must be a significant amount.


Well in that case I might give it another chance as I need as much vitamin C as I can get to help me through my predicament whilst avoiding too many cold germs.

Cheers

David


So what, having tried it my way and not found it to my liking, and since having been told several ways of cooking it, do you meat heads consider the best option? ;) :lol:
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Re: The science behind this debate

Postby GeoffDann » Tue Oct 19, 2010 12:29 pm

David Edington wrote:
David Edington wrote:
GeoffDann wrote:You can actually taste the vitamin C in beefsteak fungus, so there must be a significant amount.


Well in that case I might give it another chance as I need as much vitamin C as I can get to help me through my predicament whilst avoiding too many cold germs.

Cheers

David


So what, having tried it my way and not found it to my liking, and since having been told several ways of cooking it, do you meat heads consider the best option? ;) :lol:


I found one recipe that recomended eating it raw in salads. I haven't been brave enought to try that yet, although it is certainly the best way to preserve most of the nutrients.

I have asked your question on various internet boards and the only enthusiastic respondent suggested beefsteak fungus omelette.
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Re: The science behind this debate

Postby GeoffDann » Tue Oct 19, 2010 12:33 pm

I just typed "beefsteak fungus salad" into google and found the following

http://www.associatedcontent.com/articl ... found.html

In the forests of United States, and Europe, you can find an edible and unique fungus known as the Beefsteak Fungus. It is relatively easy to find, and is available for sale in markets in many areas in Europe. It can be generally found in lawns, and forests, and grows abundantly although one should never pick or eat any fungus without being able to identify it.


Lawns???

The Beefsteak fungus forms a symbiotic relationship with many trees, and can be found on the trunks of hardwood trees like Oak.


Symbiotic???

To many, the Beefsteak Fungus is most popular with salads. The fungus can be thinly sliced and added in with salads to accentuate the flavor.


God bless the internet.
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Re: The science behind this debate

Postby David Edington » Tue Oct 19, 2010 3:49 pm

Cheers Geoff. ;)
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Re: The science behind this debate

Postby GeoffDann » Tue Oct 19, 2010 8:52 pm

http://forum.downsizer.net/viewtopic.ph ... 37#1012237

How you cook, or not cook, is important too. Beefsteak fungus is very underrated. If cooked I find it horrible, well so horrible that I can't eat it. However, raw (or almost raw) I find it excellent. If you slice it VERY thin and just warm it through with some warm olive oil, then serve it with game it's excellent - the sour note goes great with something like venison. Beafsteak fungus does not taste anything like a mushroom, more like a fruit, and if you treat it like other wild mushrooms you'll be disappointed.


(active thread)
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Re: The science behind this debate

Postby Leif Goodwin » Tue Oct 19, 2010 9:41 pm

GeoffDann wrote:God bless the internet.


And all who sail in her.

According to Benjamin, in his book Mushrooms, Poisons and Panaceas, fungi are hard to digest, and should be cooked in order to help break down the tissue. However, if Ox Tongue fungus is sliced thin, and eaten in small quantities it should be fine, albeit with not much nourishment apart (apparently) from some trendy anti-oxidants and other 'things'.
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